July 24

How to Remain Calm in the Storm

TRANSCRIPT

Good morning, good afternoon, wherever you are, I am comfortably in my chair. It's pouring rain outside and we're talking today about your spiritual practice.

If there's one thing that solves all of life's problems, It's spiritual. And I remember being in New York, my driver who used to pick me up in my hot towncar my hire car was always the same guy. It was a priest, a minister of the church. And we had the best conversation.

Every single time he picked me up from the airport, at LaGuardia or Kennedy or wherever he come and dropped me in the middle of Manhattan.

I just loved that conversations. Now. He was steeped in the belief of the church and his religion. And our argument we had was the difference between religion and spirituality. We wouldn't we didn't never argue which one was right. We just would debate the differences. And which one held the greatest.

The greatest importance, I suppose you could say.

There was never ever a finality to it. He worked with a lot of African American people. He was African American himself, and he served this role as Minister voluntarily, and he obviously dealt with a massive amount of collaboration that was needed in a community where people were subjected to fears and uncertainties and so the community that he established and recognised was the value of his his church and dealing with the inevitable consequences of life which is death. And so he can, like knew the mastery of his religious side. I on the other hand, was working with corporate people. I was working with First Nation people up in Canada, and I was dealing with prevention. of problems. I was dealing with the individual rather than a collective. I was dealing with the individual working in an environment that was toxic or working in an environment where their own personal approach was the stigmata. That was causing their pain and trying to draw people back to self responsibility rather than a collective responsibility. And we were caught here and I in the car in these hour, two hour and a half, sometimes two hour journeys between airport and hotel, or airport and my apartment and trapped in this conversation between collective management of a problem and individual management of a problem. So today, I want to accept that the spiritual side of life is not everything. There is a collective communal thing which is not what we would call the spiritual side it is more the religious or collaborative or cultural side, where we will we lean on others and we collaborate with others to get ourselves through the journey of life.

My metaphor about all this is that it begins with me and it ends with me. I bought alone I die alone. If I react, that's my choice. I don't have a lot of choice with everything that happens to me, but I have a choice of how do I react? And there's no use me leaning on others with a reaction to something that I could improve before I lean if that makes sense to you.

One of the most important things I ever heard about spirituality is this that it must be done early. In the day. There's a lot of people will try to apply their so called self leadership, which is my new trick word for spiritual because it seems that spiritual has been hijacked, and it's not necessarily so popular anymore. But we talk about self leadership and self leadership is the spiritual aspect of life, how I react to things what triggers me, can I change those triggers? If I feel something good, am I taking responsibility for the causation of that feeling good if I feel something bad Am I taking responsibility? If I want to manifest something like a business or a wealth or a family or relationship, am I taking responsibility for the energy I'm putting out and the energy I'm putting in? And am I balancing that mathematics? It's very important, I think to understand the difference between these two. But the point I wanted to make today was spiritual practice must happen in before the day not once the day started. And the sort of things that I think are very important are grabbing and picturing and connecting with something in the beauty of the rawness of nature, without a statue on the wall without a icon of collective consciousness or anything, as an individual being able to look at a stick or look at a blade of grass or look at a flower in the micro of nature. And go wow, wow, wow. And that's the ultimate meditation. Going for a walk before you go for a run going alone somewhere with a cup of tea and just smelling the roses looking up in the sky and having what would what I would call the Arnie experience which is Total Recall thinking back over the night and the day before and going, oh, man, how lucky am I and then thinking forward in the Madonna process, which is think forward into the day and reimagine the day where you've got a meeting with this person and meeting with that court person on a phone call with this person or phone call that person, you take back the responsibility that the collective will cause which is say you got a meeting here and a meeting there and your company is going to tell you to be at work or whatever on time and reframing it in a way that makes your spirit sing. As in other words, instead of a meeting you might call it an opportunity to share some wisdom. You instead of having a phone call about something you might say a chance to connect. And whatever the language you use, it's because it makes you you, you as an individual feel more inspired about that event than meeting at 12. So this practice getting up before the sun or with the sun and getting up there and just connecting to the earth connecting. I love the idea when it's not freezing winter of walking bare feet, in the sand and on the grass to connect with the earth and let the earth energy come through me. I love this idea.

And this is where I think spirituality really needs to be respected. It is a morning practice that has a an after effect, But what's it called a second life or the when they talk about decay of an avid any of anatomy, it's got a half life, which extends through the day and the better you do, and takes 10 minutes or 15, the better you do it, the longer it lasts just like your metabolism. This is Chris, you have a great day, bye for now.

Christopher Walker


Chris Walker, CEO of Innerwealth Consulting. Chris is a highly intuitive and inspired individual. Australian born, Chris holds an M.B.A  from the Australian Graduate School of management along with a BE in Environmental Science. Chris has spent significant periods of study in India, Nepal, and Tibet studying Yoga and meditation. His change consultancy blends both East and West to bring a more sustainable and potent response to the technological demands of our times. As a successful entrepreneur Chris implemented transformational management technologies in his own business and has since consulted to over 3,000 individual leaders in personal and professional change management. The focus of Chris change technology is a unique emphasis on deeper human values linked to business performance.

The result of Chris Consulting in culture change is happier individuals, more compassionate working environments and more inspired leadership. a modern answer to a modern day problem Corporate enlightenment is truly inspirational. Chris is based in Sydney, Australia.

Chris Walker

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